Half of Brits say they can’t stop online shopping in lockdown

Brits are turning to online shopping to boost their mood and fill their time during lockdown. Photo: Tim Goode/PA Wire/PA Images
Brits are turning to online shopping to boost their mood and fill their time during lockdown. Photo: Tim Goode/PA Wire/PA Images

With after-work drinks cancelled and weekend brunches postponed, Brits have turned to online shopping to fill their time and give themselves something to do.

In a survey of 1,500 UK adults by price comparison site Idealo, nearly half (48%) of Brits said online shopping has made them feel happier during the COVID-19 lockdown, with almost a third (31%) admitting to making a purchase every single week.

What’s more, nearly half said they have become “obsessed” with buying things online since lockdown began on 21 March, while 39% admitted to buying something they “wouldn’t normally buy.”

READ MORE: Coronavirus — Top tips to save when shopping online in lockdown

A third of those surveyed said they have been buying items for their home, with home and garden being the most

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Clothes shopping after lockdown: all your questions answered

The Government’s official 50-page guideline released this week for getting Britain back to work, says that “non-essential” stores, such as fashion retailers, may be able to reopen from June 1st, provided that social distancing measures and the correct level of sanitation have been put in place. What does that really mean? When will they be ready? And how will it feel to venture into your favourite retail haunts when their look and mood has dramatically changed?

The socially undistanced queues outside some French branches of Zara last week suggest that some shoppers strongly disagree with their government’s definition of non-essential. You have to wonder what they can get in store that they haven’t been able to buy from the brand’s website, which has been functioning throughout lockdown – other than the visceral instant gratification of trying something on and taking it home.

In the UK, management consulting firm BCG

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